Death’s Garden Revisited: call for submissions

Death's Garden001Twenty years ago, I was given a box of miscellaneous cemetery photos. They had been taken by my best friend’s husband over the course of his travels around the Americas. Blair was 28 years old and dying of AIDS. He wanted to know his photos had a good home.

I decided to put together a book that would feature those photos. Initially, I was going to write all the text, but as I talked to people about the project, everyone seemed to have a cemetery story to tell.

The book title expanded from Death’s Garden to Death’s Garden: Relationships with Cemeteries. I was thrilled to discover that people I knew — even complete strangers — all had a graveyard they’d connected with, either because a family member was buried there, or because they’d visited it on vacation, or because they’d grown up in a house near it, or for a whole bouquet of other reasons.

The contributors varied from people I met through zine publishing to a ceramics professor at Ohio State University, writers for the LA Weekly, professional artists and photographers, underground musicians, depressed high school girls, and punk rock diva Lydia Lunch. As the book came together, Death’s Garden blew away my expectations.

glenwood_morrison

Morrison monument in Glenwood Cemetery, Flint – taken by Loren Rhoads

The initial print run of 1000 copies sold out 18 months after my husband and I put it together for our publishing company. I’d only asked for one-time rights to use everyone’s contributions, so I couldn’t republish it. Once it was gone, it was gone.

As the years passed, I’ve lost track of many of the contributors. Some are dead and have a different relationship with cemeteries altogether now. Others have sunk into the anonymity of a pseudonym on the internet.

For a while now I’ve wanted to assemble a second volume of Death’s Garden.  I think there are a lot more stories to be told about relationships people have formed with graveyards. For instance, what’s it like to be a tour guide? How are cemetery weddings different than others? What’s the strangest cemetery you’ve ever visited, or the most beautiful, or the spookiest?

Eventually, I’d like to put these new essays into a physical book, but for now, I’d like to feature them on Cemetery Travel. This feature is open to anyone who has ever visited a cemetery where something special happened, either good or bad.  Tell me about your relationship with a cemetery.  I’d like to publish it on CemeteryTravel.com.

What I’m looking for:

  • personal essays that focus on a single cemetery
  • preferably with pictures
  • under 1500 words (totally negotiable, but the limit is something to shoot for)
  • descriptive writing
  • characterization, dialogue, tension: all the tools you’d use to tell a story
  • but this MUST be true — and it must have happened to you!

Reprints are acceptable.  If you’ve written something lovely on your blog and wouldn’t mind it reaching the couple thousand people who subscribe to Cemetery Travel, please let me know.

If I accept your essay for publication on Cemetery Travel, be warned: I may do some light editing, with your permission.

Also, I’ll need:

  • a bio of 50-100 words
  • a photo of you
  • a link to your blog or book
  • links to your social media sites, so people can follow you.

Finally, if — as I hope — this project progresses to becoming a legitimate book, I will contact you with a contract and offer of payment.  Stay tuned!

To be absolutely clear:  I am only looking for guest posts at the moment.  Payment will come when I have the funding in place for the book.  Right now, I am only looking for one-time or reprint rights.

In the meantime, here are some links to the original Death’s Garden:

You can submit your story via the Contact Me form above or leave a comment below and I’ll get in touch.  Thanks!

Reviews of the original Death’s Garden:

Turner monument at Glenwood Cemetery, taken by Loren

Turner monument at Glenwood Cemetery, taken by Loren

“This impressive book is so striking that, upon opening its binding, one is hard pressed not to be moved by its contents. With every perusal, the reader finds another thing to think about.” — Carpe Noctem

Death’s Garden is an anthology of cemetery tours from all around the world, well-photographed, and smart enough to know it’s not the where and when of certain burial grounds that intrigues us, it’s the why as well. There’s a certain joy about Death’s Garden which is hard to pin down: the sense that just as no two graveyards are the same, no two burial beliefs are the same, either.” — Alternative Press

“The photographers and writers relay their thoughts on the relationship between the living and the dead, creating a feast for the eyes and senses. Death’s Garden goes a long way in showing just what these residences of the dead have to offer to those of us that are still among the living.” — Maximum Rock N Roll

76 responses to “Death’s Garden Revisited: call for submissions

  1. Pingback: The 4th of July if You Like Cemetery Hilltops | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  2. Pingback: Short was My Life, Long is My Rest | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  3. Pingback: Memorial Gardens | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  4. Pingback: Hotel Resurreccion | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  5. Pingback: This Week in Morbid | Morbid Is as Morbid Does

  6. Pingback: Death’s Garden: The Cemetery that Changed My Life | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  7. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Crossed Fingers | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  8. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Jacksonville Cemetery | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  9. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Toasting a Ghost in Northern Ireland | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  10. Pingback: Death’s Garden: The Sacred Heart | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  11. Pingback: Death’s Garden: A Message In the Grass | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  12. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Rozz Forever | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  13. Pingback: Death’s Garden: The Allure of the Abandoned Cemetery | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  14. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Communing with the Dead | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  15. Pingback: Death’s Garden: The Dead Dreaming | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  16. Pingback: Publications that seek creative writing about the experience of dying | Robin Mizell: Treated & Released

  17. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Westminster Church | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  18. Pingback: Death’s Garden: A Tale of 25,000 Tales | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  19. Pingback: Death’s Garden: In the Dark | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  20. Pingback: Death’s Garden: A Voice in the Cemetery | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  21. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Pushing Up Mare’s Tails | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  22. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Meditation amidst the Tombs | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  23. Pingback: Marking Fred Gwynne’s Unmarked Grave with Flowers | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  24. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Katie Likes Flowers | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  25. Pingback: Sister Act: The Story of Clarissa Terwilliger | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  26. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Ghost in the Graveyard | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  27. Pingback: Solitude and Specters at Highland Lawn Cemetery | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  28. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Martinique—an Island of Mystery | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  29. Pingback: The Taphophilic Transformation of a Tender Tot | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  30. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Chiswick New | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  31. Pingback: Brian and Paul and Me in the Cemetery | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  32. Pingback: The Legend of Black Aggie | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  33. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Cemetery Strawberries | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  34. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Coimetrophobia | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  35. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Whitby | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  36. Pingback: How the Forgotten Angels Saved My Life | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  37. Pingback: In the Shadow of Eldfell | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  38. Pingback: Death’s Garden: New Orleans Blues | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  39. Pingback: Creeping In and Out of Cemeteries | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  40. Pingback: The Symbols of Oakland Cemetery | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  41. Pingback: Death’s Garden: The Original Catacomb | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  42. Pingback: Death’s Garden: The Graveyard of my Childhood | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  43. Pingback: An Interview With Loren Rhoads | horroraddicts.net

  44. Pingback: Death’s Garden: History Lives like Ghosts | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  45. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Dancing on May’s Grave | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  46. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Night of the Reaper | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  47. Pingback: Death’s Garden: So Shall You Be | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  48. Pingback: Exhuming Corpses for Fun and Profit | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  49. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Mausoleum Walk | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  50. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Pastrami in Paris | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  51. Pingback: Death’s Garden: The Cult of Saints | Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World

  52. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Never Let Your Feet Get Cold | Cemetery Travel: Your Take-along Guide to Graves & Graveyards Around the World

  53. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Lenin’s Mausoleum | Cemetery Travel: Your Take-along Guide to Graves & Graveyards Around the World

  54. Pingback: Death’s Garden: I Found Love on Find-a-Grave | Cemetery Travel: Your Take-along Guide to Graves & Graveyards Around the World

  55. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Tombstone Tales | Cemetery Travel: Your Take-along Guide to Graves & Graveyards Around the World

  56. Pingback: Death’s Garden: Paris’s Secret Cemetery | Cemetery Travel: Your Take-along Guide to Graves & Graveyards Around the World

  57. Pingback: Local Cemetery Travel | Cemetery Travel: Your Take-along Guide to Graves & Graveyards Around the World

  58. Pingback: How the Forgotten Angels Saved My Life | Cemetery Travel: Your Take-along Guide to Graves & Graveyards Around the World

  59. Pingback: Death’s Garden: A Voice in the Cemetery | Cemetery Travel: Your Take-along Guide to Graves & Graveyards Around the World

  60. Pingback: Death’s Garden: The Dead Dreaming | Cemetery Travel: Your Take-along Guide to Graves & Graveyards Around the World

Leave a Reply to Ed Snyder Cancel reply